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Building A Coalition Case Study Paper Outline

Guidelines for Writing a Case Study Analysis

A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine the alternative solutions, and propose the most effective solution using supporting evidence. To see an annotated sample of a Case Study Analysis, click here.

Preparing the Case

Before you begin writing, follow these guidelines to help you prepare and understand the case study:

  1. Read and examine the case thoroughly
    • Take notes, highlight relevant facts, underline key problems.
  2. Focus your analysis
    • Identify two to five key problems
    • Why do they exist?
    • How do they impact the organization?
    • Who is responsible for them?
  3. Uncover possible solutions
    • Review course readings, discussions, outside research, your experience.
  4. Select the best solution
    • Consider strong supporting evidence, pros, and cons: is this solution realistic?

Drafting the Case

Once you have gathered the necessary information, a draft of your analysis should include these sections:

  1. Introduction
    • Identify the key problems and issues in the case study.
    • Formulate and include a thesis statement, summarizing the outcome of your analysis in 1–2 sentences.
  2. Background
    • Set the scene: background information, relevant facts, and the most important issues.
    • Demonstrate that you have researched the problems in this case study.
  3. Alternatives
    • Outline possible alternatives (not necessarily all of them)
    • Explain why alternatives were rejected
    • Constraints/reasons
    • Why are alternatives not possible at this time?
  4. Proposed Solution
    • Provide one specific and realistic solution
    • Explain why this solution was chosen
    • Support this solution with solid evidence
    • Concepts from class (text readings, discussions, lectures)
    • Outside research
    • Personal experience (anecdotes)
  5. Recommendations
    • Determine and discuss specific strategies for accomplishing the proposed solution.
    • If applicable, recommend further action to resolve some of the issues
    • What should be done and who should do it?

Finalizing the Case

After you have composed the first draft of your case study analysis, read through it to check for any gaps or inconsistencies in content or structure: Is your thesis statement clear and direct? Have you provided solid evidence? Is any component from the analysis missing?

When you make the necessary revisions, proofread and edit your analysis before submitting the final draft. (Refer to Proofreading and Editing Strategies to guide you at this stage).

Policies that shield people from the harm of tobacco exposure are essential to protect the health of the population. Coalitions have often led the way in safeguarding community health by promoting social norm change though policy adoption. In some states, tobacco control laws are weak, in part because of a tobacco industry tactic of prohibiting or pre-empting communities from enacting ordinances that are more protective. In spite of strong state-level preemptions, local coalitions in Oklahoma have implemented hundreds of voluntary policies in tobacco control that have improved the protection and health of their communities while not violating preemption. Three case studies of policy change are presented that exemplify the key approach of local coalitions working with strong allies and informed decision makers to establish tobacco-free businesses, schools, and outdoor recreational areas. In each of the cases, the policy changes surpassed the protection provided by the state laws and inspired additional policy changes. The key strategies and lessons learned may help tobacco control coalitions in other states limited by preemption to garner more support and momentum for important policy changes within their communities and states.