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Social And Environmental Responsibility Essay Free

Corporate Social Responsibility Essay

1334 Words6 Pages

The term Corporate Social Responsibility refers to a company’s responsibility to provide a benefit to the society the company affects. Corporate social responsibility incorporates dimensions of corporate responsibility, and corporate policy which include a company’s policy to hire minority or disabled workers, or taking a stance on social and political issues that benefit the community. The social portion of corporate social responsibility includes corporate charitable business contributions and expands on this common social business practice by invoking corporate social initiatives. For example, as a policy, Wal-Mart grocery store managers purchase as much produce and goods from local farmers and distributors they can as opposed to…show more content…

A company practicing corporate social responsibility has a greater chance of thriving within a community because of the benefits they provide to the community, while continuing to be profitable in their area of business.
There are times though, when corporations use social responsibility as a management fad or public relations ploy. For example, hot dog vending companies may package their hot dogs with labels stating their brand of hot dog is healthier than another when in truth the hot dogs are manufactured in the same plant, and are identical. There are corporations that also exploit the green movement by incorrectly labeling their products or putting green dots on aerosol cans to make them look green, when in fact chlorofluorocarbons have been banned in the U.S. since 1978, and no aerosols contain them. With all of this being said, corporate social and environmental responsibilities are more important today than they have ever been in the past, to benefit society and protect the environment. This is also true because of the interdependent and imperiled world we live in.
Business’s today are more interdependent on each other than they have ever been in the past. It is very common for corporations to outsource portions of its operations to other companies throughout the world. As these types of interdependent relationships increase, the relationships become more complicated, and the need for

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Corporate Social Responsibility Essay

1897 Words8 Pages

Corporate social responsibility is becoming a key initiative and an essential tool in the growth of multinational corporations and the development of third world countries throughout the globe. The two concepts can work hand in hand to provide benefits for all; however difficulties in regulating and implementing corporate social responsibility need to be overcome before effective changes can be made.

Definitions of corporate social responsibility can be somewhat varied depending on the perception and perspective an individual or group has towards the situation; the definition has also varied through time. In general terms, Manakkalathll & Rudolf (1995) define corporate social responsibility (CSR) as “the duty of organisations to…show more content…

Today, manager’s sensitivity to the issue is a result of pressures from the public, from interest groups, legal and governmental concerns and from media coverage (Deresky 2006). There is much debate as to what is considered socially responsible, and it is difficult to conclude where to draw the line in regards to where a company’s responsibilities begin and end. This ‘grey area’ can be attributed in part to the lack of a moral standard that can be accepted across all cultures. One side of this debate presents ethics and ethical standards as providing the basis for the adoption of CSR codes by multinational companies. Levis (2006) describes company’s CSR codes as “self regulatory instruments that address the issue of their social, environmental and human rights externalities.” These codes are generally developed in cohesion with a company’s culture and what they deem as ethical. Manakkalathil & Rudolf (1995) define ethics as “the clarification of what constitutes human welfare and the conduct necessary to promote it.” The issue with ethics and CSR in the global marketplace is the ambiguity and difficulty defining a widely accepted mode of conduct or moral universalism. Differences in the societal values across the globe make it difficult to create a universally accepted code of ethical standards to abide by.

It is for reasons

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